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Best movie-inspired cat names

From your favorite movies, you can find good names to name your cats. It can be a character you love or one that looks like your cat.

best movie inspired cat names - Best movie-inspired cat names

Check out the following list of movie-inspired cat names.

Top movie-inspired cat names

  • Aslan
  • Azrael
  • Bagheera
  • Bob
  • Clarence
  • Crookshanks
  • Duchess
  • Elsa
  • Figaro
  • Fritz
  • Jones
  • Mr. Bigglesworth
  • Nala
  • Pyewacket
  • Richard Parker

Female movie cat names

Whether it’s Mrs, Norris from “Harry Potter” fame or Meowthra, the six-toed fluffy demon cat from “Ninjago,” there are dozens of movie kitties that inspire some interesting feminine names.

  • Baby
  • Binx
  • Blanche
  • Buttercup
  • Grizabella
  • Jasmine
  • Jiji
  • Master Tigress
  • Meowthra
  • Mittens
  • Mrs. Norris
  • Sassy
  • Snowbell
  • Tao
  • Winkie

Male movie cat names

Felines featured in Disney movies like “The Aristocats,” “The Jungle Book,” and “The Lion King,” to name just a few of the Disney movie kitties on this list, have inspired pet cat names for decades.

  • Berlioz
  • Butch
  • Catbus
  • Cheshire
  • Church
  • Clawhauser
  • Diego
  • Garfield
  • Leonidas
  • Milo
  • Mr. Tibbles
  • Rajah
  • Simba
  • Tibbs
  • Tigger

Female movie character names

If you are a movie fan, in general, and you prefer a name of a human character or another type of fictional animal-go for it.

  • Bella
  • Bridget
  • Chloe
  • Dory
  • Katniss
  • Kitty
  • Lily
  • Lucy
  • Luna
  • Miss Bianca
  • Mitzi
  • Mrs. Brisby
  • Sophie
  • Stella
  • Yasha

Male movie character names

Movie mice tend to be a strong choice for cats, too. Most of the selections listed here are cinematic rodents.

  • Basil
  • Charlie
  • Fievel
  • Gadget
  • Gus
  • Jack Skelton
  • Keanu
  • Leo
  • Max
  • Mowgli
  • Oliver
  • Pikachu
  • Remy
  • Roquefort
  • Splinter

A to Z movie-inspired cat names

A–B movie-inspired cat names

  • Aslan
  • Azrael
  • Baby
  • Bagheera
  • Basil
  • Bella
  • Berlioz
  • Binx
  • Blanche
  • Bob
  • Bridget
  • Butch
  • Buttercup

C–D movie-inspired cat names

  • Catbus
  • Charlie
  • Cheshire
  • Chloe
  • Church
  • Clarence
  • Clawhauser
  • Crookshanks
  • Diego
  • Dory
  • Duchess

E–J movie-inspired cat names

  • Elsa
  • Fievel
  • Figaro
  • Fritz
  • Gadget
  • Garfield
  • Grizabella
  • Gus
  • Jack Skelton
  • Jasmine
  • Jiji
  • Jones

K–L movie-inspired cat names

  • Katniss
  • Keanu
  • Kitty
  • Leo
  • Leonidas
  • Lily
  • Lucy
  • Luna

M–N movie-inspired cat names

  • Master Tigress
  • Max
  • Meowthra
  • Milo
  • Miss Bianca
  • Mittens
  • Mitzi
  • Mowgli
  • Mr. Bigglesworth
  • Mr. Tibbles
  • Mrs. Brisby
  • Mrs. Norris
  • Nala

O–R movie-inspired cat names

  • Oliver
  • Pikachu
  • Pyewacket
  • Rajah
  • Remy
  • Richard Parker
  • Roquefort

S–Z movie-inspired cat names

  • Sassy
  • Simba
  • Snowbell
  • Sophie
  • Splinter
  • Stella
  • Tao
  • Tibbs
  • Tigger
  • Winkie
  • Yasha

When to take your cat to the vet?

You should not self-diagnose your cat’s symptoms. If you are inexperienced with caring for cats, call your vet immediately.

Here are three things that we want to share:

when take your cat to the vet - When to take your cat to the vet?

Know your cat

We can’t stress too much the importance of knowing your cat thoroughly. Through daily observation and your petting sessions (during which you’ll learn the normal “feel” of your cat’s body), learn about your cat’s normal physical condition. By learning the “normal,” you’ll be able to spot more easily when your cat is “out of whack.” Observe the following routines of your cat:

  • His Eating Habits
    Does he wolf his food in one sitting, or does he “graze” all day? A sudden lack of appetite should be cause for concern, particularly when combined with other symptoms.
  • His Elimination Habits
    Become familiar with the size, color, consistency, and odor of your cat’s feces. Note the color and amount of his normal urine output and how often he urinates normally. Diarrhea, constipation, or straining to urinate are all red flags that your cat needs to be seen by your veterinarian.
  • His Normal Gait
    A cat normally walks with a purposeful stride at measured paces. A cat’s walking style changes can signify an injury or arthritis, and a veterinarian can help.
  • Activity
    Is your cat always ready for play? Is he normally energetic, e.g., running instead of walking from one place to another? Cats normally become less active as they age, but even a senior cat should play when presented with an interactive toy. Sudden changes in your cat’s activity level can signal an injury, lethargy, or depression, all of which are symptoms that should take you to the vet.
  • Grooming Habits
    Cats are normally fastidious creatures and will spend much of their waking hours grooming themselves. Failure to groom regularly, resulting in a greasy, matted, unkempt coat, can be caused by arthritis or depression, among other causes, and is a signal the cat needs help. Conversely, a cat that suddenly starts grooming one particular area excessively may suffer skin irritation caused by fleas, mites, or the grooming itself and should be seen by a veterinarian.
  • His Sociability
    Although cats have a reputation for independence, most cats are very sociable with the other occupants of their home, both human and four-legged. A previously social cat who suddenly starts huddling in a corner has problems, either physical or emotional, and needs professional help.
  • Behavioral Changes
    The classic example is a cat suddenly urinating outside the litter box. Provided the box is clean and there are no recent environmental changes (new cat, new baby, change of residence), inappropriate urination is often a symptom of a lower urinary tract blockage or infection, both very serious conditions. A professional should see him without delay.

When in doubt, call the vet

If your cat shows any one of the previously listed symptoms for more than 12 hours or more than one of them for any length of time, I’d advise calling the veterinarian without delay. Obviously, emergencies are just that, and waiting any length of time could put your cat at risk.

Emergencies include injuries from accidents, burns, possible poisoning, insect stings or bites, seizures, or swallowing foreign objects. These conditions indicate a call to your vet during office hours or the nearest emergency veterinary clinic after-hours. Other borderline conditions, such as sudden and ongoing projectile vomiting or extreme lethargy, also merit an immediate phone call.

Our senior cat, Bubba, throws up fairly frequently, usually soon after eating. We’ve learned not to be too alarmed about it because we’ve had him checked out by our veterinarian several times. Some cats eat too fast, and if they have a particularly sensitive stomach, they’ll hurl. Still, we always watch him closely after these incidents. We’d get him to the veterinarian immediately if he ever showed any other signs of sickness (lethargy, weakness, continued vomiting, or the significant “3rd eyelid”). We’ve had cause to do so on a couple of occasions.

Know when to search the website

The Internet offers a wonderful variety of information for those seeking it, and the wealth of veterinary articles about various diseases and conditions is a good example. I’m as quick as the next person to point the mouse to seek more information about a particular condition, as I’ve done with Bubba on more than one occasion. But I did so only after our veterinarian had examined Bubba and started a course of treatment. Our vet thought I was a pest because I’d read an article and call him, saying, “What about this or that potential diagnosis?” He was understanding, though, and put Bubba through every test I suggested to ease my mind. He also listened when I suggested some alternative treatments I’d read about. If he thought a holistic remedy might help but, more importantly, would not harm, he’d try it. Otherwise, he would explain why it might not be appropriate.

The bottom line is that if your cat exhibits any unusual symptoms or a combination of symptoms, pick up the phone first, and after your veterinarian has examined the kitty and prescribed a course of treatment, then pick up the mouse and surf to your heart’s content, for a better understanding of your cat’s condition.

If you suspect your pet is sick, call your vet immediately. For health-related questions, always consult your veterinarian, as they have examined your pet, know the pet’s health history, and can make the best recommendations for your pet.

How to care for your cat?

Cat owners often ask questions about how to care for cats through many information channels, such as relatives, friends, and the internet.

how to care for your cat - How to care for your cat?

Three main building blocks form the foundation of a cat’s potential lifespan: Consistent veterinary care, a nutritious age-appropriate diet, and responsible at-home care. Maintaining a close bond with your cat is essential to ensuring the highest quality of comfort possible throughout its lifespan.

Basic cat stages of life

While it was once understood that cats go through three basic stages of age, it’s now believed they develop through six stages.

  • Kittenhood: For most cats, the growth period lasts from birth until about six months. This is when cats are most vulnerable to disease but are also at their most trainable.
  • Junior: (6 months to 2 years) Though year-old cats may appear to be adults physically, they are still developing mentally and emotionally. Think of them as juveniles.
  • Prime: (3 years to 6 years) This is young adulthood when cats are at their most virile.
  • Mature: (7 to 10 years) During these years, the first indications of chronic disease can show up, such as feline diabetes, arthritis, or heart disease.
  • Senior: (11 to 14 years) This age in cat years corresponds to a human age of 60 or older.
  • Geriatric: (15 years and older) The final stage in a cat’s life.

Preparing to care for an aging cat

As cats progress from one phase of life to the next, their care needs evolve. While they may start to function at a slower pace, your cat’s senior and geriatric stages have the potential to be some of their best years. Regular veterinary care increases your cat’s potential to thrive later in life.

Working closely with your veterinarian, knowing the signs of a healthy cat, and seeking immediate veterinary care when in doubt can go a long way toward increasing your cat’s potential lifespan.

What You Need

As your cat transitions into older age, here are some key essentials to remember when caring for an elderly feline pet:

  • Proper nutrition: The nutritional needs of healthy senior cats are not much different from those of younger adult cats. But older cats with diabetes and kidney disease will require certain dietary changes. Check with your vet to see what diet is suggested for your cats’ unique needs.
  • Plenty of water: Aging cats need to drink lots of clean, fresh water to help improve kidney function and prevent dehydration. Older cats may sometimes forget to drink, so consider adding wet food to your cat’s diet or switching to wet food for all meals to help ensure she gets plenty of fluids. You can also occasionally take your cat to its water bowl to encourage more drinking.
  • Exercise: Despite their tendency to slow down as they age, all cats benefit from regular exercise, especially those with arthritis or other joint issues. A few minutes with a ribbon or toy mouse can go a long way.
  • Comfortable resting spaces: Cats are sleepy creatures who need rest as they age. Make sure your cat’s favorite spots are cleaned and comfortable. Offer new pillows or create a cozy nook or cave to help your cat feel extra safe.
  • Gentle grooming tools: As cats age, keeping their coats clean can be more difficult. Extra grooming with a soft brush is a nice way to keep your cat’s fur in order. It’s also another way for them to receive loving attention from you.

Preventing problems with your cat during aging

While veterinary care and a nutritious diet are essential parts of responsible cat care, the following will help prevent many of the problems cats encounter as they age:

  • Disease Screening: All cats 10 years or older should be seen at least twice a year for well-check and tested for chronic diseases common to older cats. If they do have one of these conditions, your veterinarian will need to see them on a more regular basis.
  • Dental care: Although dental care is important through all life stages, it is increasingly important during cats’ senior years. Dental diseases and infections can endanger your cat’s overall health if they’re not treated. Take your aging cat for regular dental checkups and cleanings.
  • Movement and comfort: Offering massages and doing therapeutic exercises with your cat will increase comfort during later years.

General cat care

Although genetics may have the biggest effect on how cats age, there are many things we can do to maximize our cats’ life potential, starting when they first come into care as a kitten.

1. Take kittens to a veterinarian for a first visit. They will be tested for worms, checked for fleas, and given their initial vaccines. Keep newly-immunized kittens isolated from other family cats until they are cleared of communicable diseases.

Kittens should then be seen by their vet three or four times during the first year for follow-up vaccines and to be spayed or neutered.

2. Take all adopted cats of unknown parentage, including kittens, to be examined as soon as possible. The cat should be tested for FeLV (feline leukemia), FIV (the feline version of the HIV virus), and in some cases, FIP (feline infectious peritonitis).

3. Take your cat to the veterinarian once a year, starting at age one, for well-checks and booster vaccines. Senior cats may require more frequent vet visits depending on their overall health.

4. Spay and neuter cats. This helps the cat’s overall health and curbs its mating instincts, as well as helps to reduce the number of feral and stray cats.

5. Keep cats indoors. Not only will keeping your cat inside help with the stray issue, but it will also prevent your cat from getting many communicable diseases. And indoor cats do not get hit by cars or injured by wild animals.

6. Don’t declaw your cat. There’s no health reason for declawing a cat; it can do irreparable damage to its foot. It’s also extremely painful for the animal.

7. Familiarize yourself with signs of health or behavior problems, and know when to take your cat to the vet for suspected illness and emergency treatment.

If you suspect your pet is sick, call your vet immediately. For health-related questions, always consult your veterinarian, as they have examined your pet, know the pet’s health history, and can make the best recommendations for your pet.

Top black cat names

Many people are getting black cats to intend to name them but have no idea. This post will help you solve your problems.

For example, you can go down the road of the dark arts and mysticism. Or, think of black items in nature or your life that your cat reminds you of. Take a look at some of the best names for black cats and gather inspiration for a name for your new feline friend.

top black cat names - Top black cat names

Here are the top names for black cats:

Best black cat names

  • Ebony
  • Midnight
  • Salem
  • Bellatrix
  • Licorice
  • Kohl (Kohlie)
  • Onyx
  • Binx
  • Spooky
  • Magic
  • Blackie
  • Kellas
  • Hawthorne
  • Inky
  • Darth Vader
  • Gotham

Names for black male cats

Like female cats, most masculine black names reflect heroes or villains dressed in black or figures that use the cover of night to do their business.

  • Alacazam
  • Asher
  • Batman
  • Black Beard
  • BlackJack
  • Crow
  • Dante
  • Lestat
  • Mystic
  • Ninja
  • Nyx
  • Osiris
  • Panther
  • Poe
  • Zane

Names for black female cats

Black cat names tend to come from names for fictional witches or dark characters in TV shows, movies, literary fiction, or mythology.

  • Abracadabra
  • Ashley
  • Batgirl
  • Bellatrix
  • Black Beauty
  • Diabolique
  • Eclipse
  • Hecate
  • Hocus Pocus
  • Morticia
  • Mystique
  • Persephone
  • Raven
  • Sabrina
  • Silhouette

Menacing names for black cats

Since the Salem witch trials of the 1600s, the Plymouth Rock Pilgrims viewed the black cat as a witch’s companion, demonic, and related to sorcery. This dark history carries on in names for black cats today.

  • Beelzebub
  • Black Magic
  • Conjurer
  • Crypt Keeper
  • Evil
  • Deadzone
  • Death
  • Diablo
  • Lucifer
  • Magic
  • Necromancer
  • Nightmare
  • Superstition
  • Undertaker
  • Voodoo

Black cat names inspired by the dark-colored items

When people give names to pets, they often associate items from nature or objects in their lives that remind them of their pets. This list pulls potential name ideas from darkly-hued things.

  • Ash
  • Blackberry
  • Blackout
  • Carbon
  • Charcoal
  • Cinders
  • Coal
  • Dusty
  • Eight Ball
  • Inky
  • Jet
  • Obsidian
  • Shade or Shady
  • Shadow
  • Soot

A to Z black cat names

A

  • Abracadabra
  • Alacazam
  • Ash
  • Asher
  • Ashley

B

  • Batgirl
  • Batman
  • Beelzebub
  • Bellatrix
  • Binx
  • Black Beard
  • Black Beauty
  • BlackJack
  • Black Magic
  • Blackberry
  • Blackie
  • Blackout

C–D

  • Carbon
  • Charcoal
  • Cinders
  • Coal
  • Conjurer
  • Crow
  • Crypt Keeper
  • Dante
  • Darth Vader
  • Deadzone
  • Death
  • Diablo
  • Diabolique
  • Dusty

E–K

  • Ebony
  • Eclipse
  • Eight Ball
  • Evil
  • Gotham
  • Hawthorne
  • Hecate
  • Hocus Pocus
  • Inky
  • Jet
  • Kellas
  • Kohl (Kohlie)

L–N

  • Lestat
  • Licorice
  • Lucifer
  • Magic
  • Midnight
  • Morticia
  • Mystic
  • Mystique
  • Necromancer
  • Nightmare
  • Ninja
  • Nyx

O–R

  • Obsidian
  • Onyx
  • Osiris
  • Panther
  • Persephone
  • Poe
  • Raven

S–Z

  • Sabrina
  • Salem
  • Shade or Shady
  • Shadow
  • Silhouette
  • Soot
  • Spooky
  • Superstition
  • Undertaker
  • Voodoo
  • Zane

Fun fact black cat

Depending on the culture, black cats are an omen for good luck or bad luck. In the U.S. and a majority of western European countries, a black cat crossing your path is considered a harbinger of bad things. However, in the United Kingdom and Japan, the superstition is quite the opposite, a black cat is a good omen.

Even the direction that a cat walks can have significance. Pirates of the 18th century believed that a black cat walking toward someone would bring that person bad luck. If a black cat walks away from someone, then that person will have good luck.

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